This original linocut print features the magnificent Dunstable Swan jewel in the British Museum in London and is printed in four colours created from four separate plates.

 

About the Jewel

 

The Dunstable jewel dates from around 1400 and was made either in England or France using a process known as en ronde bosse, in which enamel is laid over a gold frame. Of exquisite beauty, the swan is approximately 1.25 inches in height; the gold chain attached to it is around 3 inches in length.

 

A link to King Arthur

 

The jewel was a livery device, showing loyalty to a leading figure; in this case either Henry IV (the former Henry Bolingbroke) or his son, Henry V. A black and white version of this print features as one of the illustrations to my forthcoming translation of the Alliterative Morte Arthure which publishes in September 2020.


It is possible that this magnificent poem was written in support of the newly-crowned usurper king; I have incorporated this print within the book to reflect this possibility. If you pledge support for the book before April 20th 2020, your name will appear in the back as a patron. More here

 

About the print

 

One of variable edition of 6, hand printed on a Victorian cast iron nipping press in Hertfordshire, UK. Signed and editioned by the artist and printed on 250 gsm Somerset Velvet Paper. The printed part of the image measures approximately 6 x 6 inches (15 x 15cm).

 

 

 

 

The Dunstable Swan Jewel - Original Linocut Print

£45.00 Regular Price
£40.50Sale Price
  • The print will be supplied in a robust cardboard tube, protected by acid-free tissue paper. Postage and Packing in the UK is free of charge; charges for mailing outside the UK are incorporated in the shopping basket.

© 2020, Michael Smith, all rights reserved

Original linocut prints, books  and greetings cards featuring a range of mediaeval themes including: the Battle of Agincourt; Sir Gawain and the Green Knight; King Arthur;;Stonehenge; Viking art; Saxon art; the Sutton Hoo helmet; medieval animals; castles; medieval myths and legends; historic monuments and so much more!

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